Interview with Cori

1) Introduce Yourself.

I’m Cori. A 49-year-old woman quickly approaching my 50th turn around the sun.

2) How did you eat before Carnivore?

I’ve been a whole food eater most of my life. Processed food has never appealed to me. Although I never referred to myself as a vegan or vegetarian, my diet was plant-based for most of my adult life.

3) Why did you try Carnivore to begin with.

For the first few months I had no idea that my way of eating had a name. I have a laundry list of health issues—panhypopituitarism (with an autoimmune component, celiac disease (diagnosed over a decade ago) and Duhring’s disease, adenomyosis, and fibromyalgia. After exposure to gluten in the spring of 2018, I developed Duhring’s disease (celiac disease that presents on the skin. I was dead set on not going on antibiotics and steroids to treat my Duhring’s and other issues I had at the time. First, I cleaned out our entire pantry and fridge. Anything that could potentially cause cross-contamination went into the bin. Still, stomach and skin issues persisted. I began to notice blisters cropping up along with my Duhring’s (dermatitis herpetiformis) rash—skin flare-ups were happening long after my gluten exposure. Over the weeks I recorded my food and anything that made my skin worse or aggravated my stomach went. Eventually, all I was left with was tinned fish, eggs, and muscle meat. Eventually, I did see an improvement in my skin and I was beginning to feel better overall but I became concerned that my way of eating wasn’t sustainable, so I took to the internet (how did we survive before Google?) and came across Dr. Georgia Ede and Sally K. Norton, and several folks that referred to themselves as ”Carnivore” following their Twitter accounts. I reached out to Georgia directly and she assured me that I could indeed live a long and healthy life without plants and although I still can’t make rhyme or reason as to why I respond the way I do to so many plants, Sally helped me gain some understanding and gave me the additional confidence I needed to step away from plants.

4) How do you personally approach the Carnivore Diet.

I eat what makes me feel good. Long before Carnivore I was supporting my small, local farmers and producers; I continue to do so as a carnivore.  My approach is more nose-to-tail. I like the sustainability and I believe it’s what’s best for me. I do drink organic coffee (organic matters here, folks) and enjoy limited dairy— butter and cheese. Sometimes it bothers me, sometimes it doesn’t.

5) What benefits have you seen since starting the Carnivore Diet.

Just about every symptom I have/had from my autoimmune diseases has disappeared or improved. I do fast as well to help with my low levels of GH due to my pituitary disorder, autoimmune issues, and familial cancers. I credit fasting with helping me just as much as carnivore. I work out pretty intensely and with the exception of a very slow healing hamstring that I tore a few weeks in to fasting and Carnivore and some foot problems I’ve suffered from for years from repeated fractures and injuries, I haven’t had any other tears or bone fractures/breaks. That in and of itself is a major coup for me! I feel (cautiously) invincible these days.

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6) What negatives have you found with the Carnivore Diet.

Socially, it can be a bit awkward, but Carnivore isn’t a choice for me. Plants, (and the oils every kitchen seems to use), make me sick and I also have to worry about cross-contamination due to my celiac/Duhring’s disease so eating outside the house is an issue. I’ll only do it when I have no other choice, mostly on the road. It’s a risk for me, Carnivore or not.

7) Do you exercise on the Carnivore Diet, if so how do you find it and what do you do.

I do exercise. It took me a good 5-6 months to fully adapt. I really thought I’d be working out at half-intensity from here on out, but then one day it just clicked and my body was able to perform just fine without carbohydrates. I love lifting and my focus is on building and maintaining muscle (a struggle with low GH). Currently, I do an upper/lower split 4 days a week. I spend 1.5-2 hours at the gym. Maybe too much to some, but I find it cathartic. I do very little cardio. Just enough to work my ticker and to keep up my endurance.

8) What piece of advice would you give someone who is interested in trying this diet, but hasn’t taken the leap yet.

I reckon if someone is considering Carnivore they’ve tried everything and nothing else has worked, so I say to them, ”what have you got to lose?” But I do believe that if you’re going to do it, you need to go all in. You don’t want to dabble in high-fat eating AND carbs … It’s a recipe for disaster. If you can’t commit 100% this might not be a way of eating for you.

9) Do you think Carnivore will ever be accepted as a mainstream diet.

I hope so.

10) Anything you would like to add, and where can people follow you.

Although I’m happy to share my experience and what I do that works for me and my very specific set of problems, I’m cautious when it comes to doling out advice. Look to the medical professionals & researchers in the Carnivore space for answers and not schmos like me. They’re pretty generous with their knowledge and time. @cori__p on Instagram

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