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Meat Up Year Two

Meat Up: 2 years later with Miki

You can check out Miki’s previous stories here – Carnivore Diet Success & Meat Up year 1

Interview with Miki

1) How would you currently describe your current way of eating. 

My current way of eating is macro split of C35/P35/F30 daily calorie intake. It is more like eating clean and eating to fuel my body, thinking of digestive health, workout energy and whatnot. 

2) What have you learned regarding nutrition over the last year.

After doing carnivore and keto for a while 2018-2019, I screwed up my gut microbiome where I developed IBS-D and had intense tummy pains that some days I could not even leave the house. I corrected it by incorporating pre- and pro-biotic foods, tracking my menstrual cycle with daily mood and bowel movements. I have made major improvements. 

3) What health & Fitness improvements, and/or setbacks have you experienced in the last year.  

Because of the pandemic, I have been spending a lot of time working out at home, learning Olympic lifts and continue to build muscle and coaching my clients. I have gained tremendous amount of strength this past year, doing pull ups and been able to deadlift more than 2x my body weight. I would rather be strong than stage lean all year around and that is the positive thing that came out of this past year, I have a better relationship with myself and body image. 

4) What are your health and fitness goals in the year ahead.

I plan to compete, have my Pro debut in the Bikini Category in the fall. I am excited to cut down and see all the progress I’ve made over the past two years. 

5) Anything else to add? and where can people follow your journey?

No diet is the end all be all. If it works for you, great, if it does not you have to find something that does. 

You can follow my journey at @miki_jams_with_kittens 

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Meat Up Year One

Meat Up: 1 year later with Dwayne

Interview with Dwayne

Dwayne did a carnivore diet success story over a year ago which you can read here

1) How would you currently describe your current way of eating. 

Still carnivore, not as strict, we call our approach animal based now.  I have healed my leaky gut and now find I am able to have more variety and have no digestive issues from it.   I have spices now and add some things for flavour enhancers, like garlic or fried onions occasionally.  Carnivore way of eating though is where I feel best my best. 

2) What have you learned regarding nutrition over the last year.

I have learned you will continue to feel benefits from carnivore well into your second year and personally I never seem to tire of animal foods.  Trusting the process and keeping with it until your gut is healed is very important. 

3) What health & Fitness improvements, and/or setbacks have you experienced in the last year.  

I’ve been able to maintain my weight loss, continue to build muscle slowly. Health has continued to improve.  Over the holidays I let myself eat all foods, I knew carbs were addictive but was blown away how fast that addiction can come back, its a slippery slope and can be very hard to break it all over again. I struggled after the holidays for longer than I would have like to before getting back on track.  Because of that experience I try not to let myself go off track any more. 

4) What are your health and fitness goals in the year ahead.

Continue working out 3-4 days a week, maintain a lean physique and continue to optimize my health on an animal-based way of eating, cold therapy, sauna, and our many sleep hacks.

5) Anything else to add? and where can people follow your journey?

@ourinfinitehealth on Instagram is where we post about our health journey, bio hacks we are trying out and our hope is to help others find success improving their health as well. 

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Contemporary Carnivore Diet

The Top 4 Benefits of Eating Heart

This article was originally published at www.carnivoreaurelius.com, they have given me permission to share to help spread the benefits of the carnivore diet.

We love organ meats around here and heart is no exception. Mainstream eating culture in the US has not fully embraced the idea of eating organ meats but, let’s be honest, if we relied on mainstream advice we’d all be fat and sick. 

In fact, it is somewhat ironic that many people consider the vital survival organs of the body (brain, heart, kidney, liver, and lungs) as waste products. They are so infrequently consumed in the US that they are a leading export product.  

But organ meats, and heart in particular, are loaded with nutrients and provide many health benefits. To understand the benefits of heart as a superfood within the diet, we need look no further than human history and nutrition research.

History Loves Organ Meats

Organ meats have been a part of a healthy human diet for centuries. Organ meats are by far the most nutrient dense (nutrients per calorie) part of an animal. The concept of eating nose to tail prevents excess waste and is also a foundational practice for nourished living. 

That’s why many cultures around the world enjoy their own organ meat delicacies:

  • Scotland has haggis (ie, sheep or calf heart, liver, and lungs mixed with suet, oatmeal, and seasonings boiled in a bag made from the animal’s stomach).
  • Jewish cultures have chopped liver
  • Bolivians savor tenderized beef heart that has been cooked over charcoal
  • Pakistani cultures make a hash of heart, intestines, livers

Despite the historical health benefits, the US is almost last in terms of consumption of organ meats. Out of every country in the world, the US ranks 171st out of 175 countries in organ meat eaten per person per year (*). It’s not surprising that the US also ranks highest in modern health problems like heart disease, obesity, autoimmune disease and diabetes. It’s pretty safe to say we aren’t exactly known for our healthy eating habits (hence the SAD, standard american diet, acronym).

Like Fuels Like

Beyond analyzing cultures around the world that eat organ meats, the benefits can be sorted out by reviewing nutrients contained in the meat and what role they play in the body.

Heart is a good source of many important nutrients including:

  • Coenzyme Q10
  • Iron
  • Zinc
  • Selenium
  • B2 (Riboflavin)
  • B6 (Pyridoxine)
  • B9 (Folate)
  • B12 (Cobalamin)

Human nutrition research often demonstrates the concept of ‘like supports like’. That is to say the micro and macronutrients in organs and tissues of animals support those same organs and tissues in humans. For example animal muscle meats, fuel growth and repair of human muscles. Similarly, the nutrients in animal organ meats support that same organ in the human body. 

The nutrients contained in the heart support the function of the heart as well as the entire cardiovascular system. And because nutrients rarely have just one function, these same vitamins and minerals also support cognitive function, energy levels, natural immunity and even promote longevity.

Top 5 Health Benefits

The specific nutrients in the heart solidify its place as a true superfood in the diet.

According the the USDA a 100 g (3.5 oz) portion of beef heart contains:

  • 112 calories
  • 18 grams of protein
  • 4.31 mg of iron (24% DV)
  • 287 mg of potassium (6% DV)
  • 21 mg of magnesium (5% DV)
  • 21.8 mcg of selenium (40% DV)
  • 1.70 mg of zinc (15% DV)
  • 7.53 mg of niacin (47% DV)
  • 1.79 mg of pantothenic acid (26% DV)
  • 1 mg of riboflavin (70% DV)
  • 0.3 mg of vitamin B6 (21% DV)
  • 0.24 mg of vitamin B9/Thiamin (20% DV)
  • 8.5 mcg of vitamin B12 (356% DV)
  • 11. 3 mg Coenzyme Q10 (no DV established)
  • 17 mcg of lycopene
  1. Protect your heart

I am going to repeat myself here bThe nutrients in heart protect your own human heart. Folate and B12 may reduce the risk of fatal heart disease in adults (*).

Homocysteine levels in the blood are regulated by vitamins B6 and B12 as well as folate. Elevated levels of homocysteine are an independent risk factor for heart disease and high blood pressure. Getting B6, B12 and folate from your diet reduces homocysteine concentration in the blood and therefore reduces risk of these common cardiovascular conditions (*).

B vitamins also support blood vessels formation and some studies link higher intake of B vitamins to reduces risk of peripheral artery disease (PAD) (*)

Cholesterol levels are positively influenced by B vitamins (*,*).

Heart is also a great source of the little known or talked about nutrient coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10). 

CoQ10 is found in the mitochondria of muscle cells (including the heart muscle) and has several important roles in the body, including:

  • Acting as an antioxidant protecting cell membranes and lipoproteins
  • Supporting the production of cellular energy (Adenosine Triphosphate aka ATP)

Taking statin drugs to lower cholesterol, reduces the concentration of CoQ10 in the body. It’s a bit ironic that this major treatment (aka bandaid) for cholesterol is meant to reduce heart disease risk but in fact, decreases the concentration of a nutrient known to protect the heart. Makes you wonder who’s running the show, doesn’t it?

  1. Boost Cognitive Function

Some of the nutrients found in heart support optimal cognitive function including the B vitamins and Coenzyme Q10.

Dementia

B vitamins (B6, folate, and B12) regulate homocysteine (Hcy) levels, and hyperhomocysteinemia is a major vascular risk factor and an established risk factor for dementia.  The active form of folate, is involved in DNA repair and replication, both essential processes for adult hippocampal neurogenesis (new neuron formation in the brain (*).

Mood

The integral role of B vitamins as cofactors in cellular processes such as the methionine and folate cycles have formed the basis for hypotheses relating B vitamin status with mood . Vitamins B6, B12, and folate are commonly acknowledged as cofactors for enzymatic reactions in the methionine and folate cycles. The B vitamins are required for clearance of homocysteine (*). As you’ve probably learned so far, high homocysteine is toxic, especially to your most important organs like your brain and heart. So it should be no surprise that elevated levels of homocysteine are a risk factor for poor mood and depression. One study found that up to 30% of depressed patients have elevated homocysteine levels (*). Adequate intake of B vitamins is required for healthy homocysteine levels and this can translate into better brain health.

  1. Support Immune System 

I think we can all agree that a well-oiled immune system is a high priority given the current circumstances. 

Heart is a good source of zinc, providing 15% of the DV for this important mineral that helps the immune system function optimally. Zinc has a number of functions related to immunity including (*):

  • Development of cells that mediate immunity
  • Influence cellular behavior beneficial to immunity (killing damaged cells)
  • Preserves natural tissue barriers including those of the respiratory tract
  1. Increase Vitality

Iron, B vitamins and coenzyme Q10 are all essential nutrients for high energy, mental sharpness and sex drive. 

Iron delivers oxygen to all your tissues so they can function properly. Without oxygen you’ll feel sluggish and fatigued. Iron deficiency anemia is the most common micronutrient deficiency in the world. Heart, and other organ meats, are a great source of iron.

Coenzyme Q10 has a very different job than iron however, when you don’t have enough, you feel it. Que the fatigue, muscle weakness, memory problems, and low sex drive.

Finally, B vitamins are the nutrients that help your body turn energy from food into energy for your cells. Without adequate cellular energy, each cell, tissue, organ system are less able to carry out work. And, you’ll feel this – more fatigue, sluggishness, slower metabolism and decreased endurance and stamina.

Taste and Texture

All well and good, right? Of course we all want to enjoy superfoods but how does it actually taste? What is the texture? What does it look like? The benefits won’t do you any good unless you’re able to choke it back. 

The taste and texture of heart have been compared to eating brisket or steak. The heart is a muscle that gets quite a bit of work in its lifetime. So it may be a little tough. Chef’s prefer low and slow cooking methods or cutting it into smaller pieces and cooking over high heat like the grill.

We haven’t taken the plunge into heart jerky yet but our liver jerky is wildly popular among health enthusiasts who want to not just choke back their organ meats but actually enjoy them.

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Carnivore Diet Success Stories

Carnivore Diet success stories with Emma

Interview with Emma

1) Introduce Yourself.

Hi, my name is Emma. I’m a mummy to a beautiful 3-year-old little boy. I have been a qualified nurse for 8 years and just recently been promoted to clinical lead.

I’ve always struggled with my weight even as a child. When I look back at my childhood and the foods I was eating, I can’t help but shudder! I can’t blame my parents as they were giving me foods only deemed ‘healthy’ but were far from the truth!

As a young teenager I would go out partying and mix the alco-pops with fried carb heavy food! No wonder the weight kept piling on. 

In my 20s I was overweight and I thought low calorie diets where carbs were heavily included were the way to go, how wrong. Weight watchers, slimming world were the heavy offenders! Promoting having carbs and eat as much speed food as you can but myself not realising that these speed foods were full of sugar. They promoted to eat 3 meals a day and 2 snacks!! Which I now know is insane, constantly stimulating an insulin response and making my body have a very bad issue of being insulin resistant. The hunger was beyond control due to the foods I was consuming not being satiating. The hungrier I was the more overeating I would do at the next meal. Such a vicious cycle I was stuck in. I’d drop at the very most 2 stone and more would come back on. It was neve1r sustainable.

August 2019 myself and my fiancé decided to try Keto. That was 18 months ago and I’m down 68lbs.  I have never felt healthier! 

Keto/carnivore has given me the ability to not be ruled by food, and as a family we are teaching our little boy the appropriate relationship with food. 

2) How did you eat before Carnivore.

I was on keto before carnivore, so I was eating all different varieties of foods but found I still would overindulge if I could on deserts!! My weakness! 

3) Why did you try Carnivore to begin with.

I hated counting macros I was so religious I would not eat anything unless it was counted for. I felt a little but like I was not free to just enjoy the food I would be so worried I over consumed my carbs. Carnivore gave me freedom to eat from a certain variety of food without that pressure. 


4) How do you personally approach the Carnivore Diet.

I stuck to a variety of meats, eggs, and little dairy consumption with no variance of plan for about 9 months. The last few months I have been experimenting with adding pecans, cacao, and avocado in. However, I have learned my body does not appreciate the avocado at all. It leaves me with bad stomach cramps. This might be down too not having a tolerance for this food anymore. 

Due to my working schedule, I do OMAD Monday-Friday and weekends 2MAD this seems to be working well. 


5) What benefits have you seen since starting the Carnivore Diet.

My energy levels are amazing, I am so satiated which allows me to OMAD quite regularly. 

A huge benefit I’ve noticed on carnivore is I can see more that my visceral fat has melted away! My waist has gone tiny and that’s where I held all my fat post having a baby. 

6) What negatives have you found with the Carnivore Diet.

Depending on my hormones being female I would have really bad food aversions and the sight of certain meats would turn me. Which makes it difficult on an all-meat diet! 


7) Do you exercise on the Carnivore Diet, if so how do you find it and what do you do.

I have been recovering from a work injury so only been doing controlled physio. However, I have just started a new fitness goal and its going well. 


8) What piece of advice would you give someone who is interested in trying this diet, but hasn’t taken the leap yet.

What have you got to lose? Trust that your body will thank you for this huge leap of faith. Make sure you look at the research, so you know you are getting all your nutrients. But just simply enjoy!!! Let loose and feel the freedom of not being controlled by sugar cravings. Take back the control! Its liberating!!! 


9) Do you think Carnivore will ever be accepted as a mainstream diet.

I would hope so but not until the government decide to delete all their so-called research for what is considered a ‘balanced diet’. 

10) Anything you would like to add, and where can people follow you.

Try it! I was only going to do carnivore for a week, that went on to a month and then it became 11 months.!! I have never been happier! 

Yes, the weight loss helps but truly my relationship with food and general health have improved so much. Why would I ever want to go back to being sluggish, carb induced obesity! 

Eat the meat you can it doesn’t have to be expensive. Make small changes to being with and you will notice massive improvements in yourself.  You can find me on instagram @ ourmetabolicjourney

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Carnivore Diet Success Stories

Carnivore Diet success stories with Richard

Interview with Richard

1) Introduce Yourself.

Hi, my name is Richard. I am 42 years old. I’m engaged to my fiancée Emma and we have a 3-year-old son who follows a ketogenic diet. 

2) How did you eat before Carnivore.

Ketogenic diet for 7 months. Prior to this I struggled unsuccessfully with low calorie, low fat diets.

3) Why did you try Carnivore to begin with.

I started as a one-month trial initially not expecting to do it long term. I tried this following weight loss stall on keto. I was curious about claims of improved digestion and leaner bodies.

4) How do you personally approach the Carnivore Diet.

Try to eat beef and at least 6 eggs every day.  I eat a variety of meats including lamb, pork, chicken, salmon, trout, haddock, scallops, and prawns. For beef, pork, lamb, and chicken, I eat the fattiest cuts available.  I cook mainly in ghee and beef dripping/tallow.  I eat liver and heart twice a month on average.  I season food in salt, pepper, onion powder, garlic powder and sometimes chilli powder and paprika.  I use condiments but limit to very low carb hot sauces.  I limit dairy but do not avoid it completely.  I eat desserts quite frequently made from eggs, sour cream, vanilla and erythritol. I drink mainly mineral water. I often drink black coffee but have recently switch to black tea. Treats are very very rare and are strictly limited to keto foods which include some nut flours, erythritol and cacao. Meal frequency is usually OMAD or 2MAD with no snacks.  I eat until I am absolutely full.

5) What benefits have you seen since starting the Carnivore Diet.

Improved digestion.  Further weight loss. Leaner body.  Fewer cravings. No need to track calories or macros. Easier food prep than keto. 

6) What negatives have you found with the Carnivore Diet.

Lack of variety but I got used to it pretty quickly.  Less energy than on keto.  

7) Do you exercise on the Carnivore Diet, if so how do you find it and what do you do.

Yes. I do weightlifting and body weight resistance circuit/Hiit training 2-3 times a week. Usually 20-45 minutes.  

8) What piece of advice would you give someone who is interested in trying this diet, but hasn’t taken the leap yet.

Understand your reasons for doing it. Is it an elimination diet for ailments, digestive reset, or long-term body composition reason?  If your gonna trial it, stick it out for at least 30-60 days.  Don’t worry about the lack of fibre, you don’t need fibre in your diet.  Carnivore isn’t as limiting as you think, and you get used to eating what’s available. There’s some flexibility depending on your body’s tolerances, like some veg, dairy, berries etc. 

9) Do you think Carnivore will ever be accepted as a mainstream diet.

Absolutely not. There is too much stigma and too much influence by regulatory bodies, celebrities, big food etc.  There’s not enough accessible or widespread education on the subject unless you are open minded and willing to look things up yourself. Messages regarding environmental issues are very inaccurate and misleading.  Misconceptions over saturated fats and red meat need to be corrected.  

10) Anything you would like to add, and where can people follow you.

Ask yourself ‘If our existence on this plant is based on the successful evolution of our ancestors, what did our ancestors eat for 100s of million years?’ If you don’t know, look it up using quality data.  Do you think eating anything different to this in the past 100 years of our existence will improve on this?

Follow us on Instagram: ourmetabolicjourney 

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Contemporary Carnivore Diet

7 Tribes That Loved Beef Liver

This article was originally published at www.carnivoreaurelius.com, and they have given me permission to share here.

Your ancestors knew it. But you forgot. Liver was pivotal to evolution. It was reserved for those first who needed nutrients the most. Pregnant women and children. 

People pounced on it like kids on kit kat bars today. There were no nutritionists telling them to eat it. They didn’t even follow me on Twitter!

They just knew they felt better when they did.

There are examples throughout history. 

But now we’ve forgotten and lost our roots. We’re hairless apes transported to a modern arcade. 

Staples of society have been transformed into junk. Instead of liver, we drink watered down, toxic kale smoothies. We take pills. 

But liver is unique in its nutritional benefits

Adding it is like superman putting on his cape. It will transform you. Strip away layers of comfort. Build up your cells fresh. 

Why Beef Liver May Be Beneficial

Beef liver is nature’s multivitamin. 

Even though it hasn’t been getting the same attention as it used to, the liver is quite possibly the most nutrient-dense food on the planet.

Liver used to be an extremely popular delicacy before people started favoring muscle meats for their flavor. Often hunter-gatherers would go straight for the organ meat before anything else.

Most people assume that fruits and vegetables are the best way to get your essential vitamins and minerals but beef liver is loaded with even more nutritional value.

Just 100g amount of liver contains more than 100% of the recommended daily value for various micronutrients and it’s a great source of protein.

I’m not going to claim that without liver you’re going to fester away with scurvy. But according to the RDAs, without liver on the carnivore diet you’ll be getting suboptimal amounts of many nutrients. 

Many carnivore dieters live by beef liver because it helps them get optimal amounts of vitamins A, B, E, D, choline, copper, and iron. Some of which are not present at all in steaks alone. 

50g-100g of beef liver a day could help satisfy many nutrient needs. This comes out to approximately:

Staple foods in the carnivore diet

This is a big reason why so many people experience benefits when adding beef liver. 

Couple this with some eggs, bone marrow and grass-fed muscle meat and you’ll be getting more nutrients than 99% of people.

7 Examples of Tribes Eating Beef Liver

Beef liver has always been a delicacy. For many primitive tribes, it was the first food they’d go after when killing an animal.

It was equivalent to Fruit Roll Ups for children. They couldn’t get enough of it.

Nature is simple. Our physiological response directed us to what our body required. And most primitive carnivores required the nutrients in beef. 

This is what made it taste so good or why people craved it.

I know it’s hard to believe given nobody eats beef liver today. Below are some examples:

#1 West Nile Tribes

Dr. Weston Price traveled throughout Africa in the 1930s to examine dental health. He noticed that Tribes in Africa still eating primitive diets had little to no signs of tooth decay and beautiful teeth.

Meanwhile the United States counterparts were ridden with issues.

I envy these children who didn’t need headgear or rubber bands for all that time…

According to Dr. Price, the children of the west Nile were highly immune to dental caries and were physically very healthy. The women were over 6 ft tall and many men were over 7 ft.

The people at the Nile prized liver as a sacred obsession:

I learned that they have a belief which to them is their religion, namely, that every man and woman has a soul which resides in the liver and that a man’s character and physical growth depend upon how well he feeds that soul by eating the livers of animals. The liver is so sacred that it may not be touched by human hands. It is accordingly always handled with their spear or saber, or with specially prepared forked sticks. It is eaten both raw and cooked — Dr. Weston Price

#2 Outer Herbides

Tribes in the Outer Herbides exhibited a similar immunity. One of their dietary staples was a dish consisting of cod’s liver and cod’s head.

“This diet, which included a liberal supply of fish, included also the use of livers of fish. One important fish dish was baked cod’s head that had been stuffed with oat meal and chopped cods’ livers. This was an important inclusion in the diets of the growing children. The oats and fish, including livers, provided minerals and vitamins adequate for an excellent racial stock with high immunity to tooth decay.”

#3 Comanche

The Comanche were one of the most powerful American Indian tribes in history. Their diet consisted largely of buffalo and meat.

The Children of the Comanche were obsessed with liver.

“Children would rush up to a freshly killed animal, begging for its liver and gallbladder. They would then squirt the salty bile from the gallbladder onto the liver and eat it on the spot, warm and dripping blood.”

Liver is incredible for your health. But let’s face it. Eating liver has always been a pain in the ass. Not anymore.

If you’re interested in buying the most nutritious and best-tasting liver product in the world, go here for my newly released beef liver crisps made for carnivores by carnivores. Nothing but sea salt and beef liver. Crunchy. Smoky. Flavorful. And f***ing nutritious.

It’s no exaggeration to say there’s nothing like this in the world, at all, anywhere. 

#4 Native Americans

Some other notable accounts of native American’s eating liver existed.

In The Ways of My Grandmothers, Beverly Wolf describes how they’d prepare the entire cow, nose to tail to be eaten. The liver, of course, was important:

“All the insides, such as heart, kidneys and liver, were prepared and eaten, roasted or baked or laid out in the sun to dry. The lungs were not cooked”

Other Native Americans, called Mountain Men here, prized the liver even over the meat of the Buffalo. The lean meat was often discarded and left to scavengers, while the mountain men prized the fats and organ meats for themselves.

“When game was plentiful, however, only a few choice parts were taken, and the vast bulk of the meat was left to scavengers. The small and large humps were usually taken first….The tongue was removed by “ripping open the skin of the lower jawbone and pulling it out through the oriface. The heart and liver were added to the fare.”

When deprived of food for an extended period of time, Mountain Men would go straight for the liver and organs. They didn’t show much table manners either:

“When mountain men had been without meat for several days before slaying a buffalo, all traces of Anglo-Saxon civilization vanished instantly. The liver was torn from the body cavity. Bloody and unwashed, it was seasoned with gunpowder, or by squeezing the gall bladder’s contents over it, and then consumed without further preparation.”

#5 Inuit

Many carnivores have the false belief that the inuit avoid organs, just because Viljamurr Stefansson suggested that. However, there’s copious evidence that manl other inuit groups prized liver. 

Additionally, according to Vilhamurr Stefansson, ““The groups that depend on the blubber animals are the most fortunate, in the hunting way of life, for they never suffer from fat-hunger”

Blubber contains substantial amounts of vitamin A and fat soluble vitamins, thus they may have been getting these needs elsewhere. If you’re avoiding liver just because Stefansson did, be careful unless you’re eating blubber. (If you are, please send me some).

The most comprehensive study of the Inuit found extensive variety in their food consumption:

“This included ringed seal meat, blubber, liver, flippers, heart, brain, eyes, intestine, ear, tongue, lungs, blood and stomach, bearded seal meat, blubber and intestines, narwhal and walrus meat, liver, heart, blubber, mattak, flippers and intestine, beluga meat, mattak, blubber and liver, polar bear meat and fat, caribou meat, brain, tongue, stomach contents and lining, heart, lungs, lips, cartilage, bone marrow and eyes, arctic char meat and skin, sculpin, halibut, cod and fish eggs, arctic tern eggs, seagull ptarmigan and various ducks and shellfish”

Now that’s what I call a real salad. 

Additionally, according to a study by Borre Clyde River inuit would first eat liver and the blood after killing a seal and then later move onto brain fat and meat. That’s a full 3 course meal. 

On Lake Harbour on Baffin Island, men would eat the liver first and women would eat the heart. The remainder would be divided equally. Lastly, Grise Forde Inuit were known to consume the “the meat, blubber, liver, intestine and heart of ringed seals, preferring young seals. Dogs consumed the remainder of seals not eaten by humans.”

All in all, it’s clear that Inuit prized fat soluble vitamin intake and all of the vitamins in Liver. 

#6 Neurs

Modern day Sudan is home to several tribes of great interest. They are known to be exquisite hunters and warriors. 

One of the tribes, the Neurs is exceptional. They’re very tall. Women are over 6 feet tall and men over seven. Dr. Weston Price couldn’t find one tribe menter with a dental issue, so he was particularly interested in their dietary habits. 

What did he learn?

Neurs believe that every man and woman has a soul that lives in the liver. And that how strong an individual depends on how well they feed that soul with the livers of animals. 

Similar to the Church of Scientology requiring exorbitant payments, this church feeds off of the liver. 

The liver was so sacred to them that they refused to touch it with their hands. 

If only today we could replace the obsession with junk food with this religion. 

#7 Nenets

Western Siberia is one of the most hostile places to life in the world. Residents do the exact opposite of what the western culture nutritional orthodoxy:

  • Eat a lot of meat
  • Fast frequently
  • Spend a lot of time in the cold
  • Only eat one type of animal for long periods of time

Yet they’re much healthier than we are. The culture of doctors, nutritionists, micromanagers. Where everybody cares so much more about their health, they’re less healthy. 

One of their biggest secrets: eating nose to tail. They eat just about every part of the animal. 

8-year-old children prize the raw liver. Meanwhile, most children in western society are fed Gerber and sugar infested junk. 

And one of the region’s most prominent politicians eats liver almost every day :

“Sergey Kharutsji…..his wife, Galina, and daughter, Oxana, serve up a diet not very different from that served in the chum: frozen reindeer meat, stroganina, raw reindeer liver and various other named and unnamed cuts. Oxana says that is what the family eats every day for most meals.” 

Conclusion

Liver is nature’s original multivitamin. When I started eating it, my health got substantially better. 

But I always hated eating it.

It’s why I’m creating this product. I’d love for you to be on board as an early consumer. 

We’re keeping the launch very small so we can test it with only the most excited people. 

It’s no exaggeration to say there’s nothing like this in the world, at all, anywhere.

Categories
Carnivore Diet Success Stories

Carnivore Diet success stories with Yuli

Interview with Yuli

1) Introduce Yourself.

I’m Yuli, born in the Soviet Union, raised in Israel, lived in Germany for 8 years and now living in the UK. The carnivore diet helped me reverse and put into permanent remission; Crohn’s disease, Hashimoto thyroiditis, PCOS, IBS, inflammatory arthritis, depression, brain fog, migraines, and a binge eating disorder. I’ve been exclusively carnivore for about 3 years and recently started adding some non-sweet fruit and veg into my diet with no issues, yet animal products are always the main part of every single meal I eat.  

My personal journey may have started with me only trying to change my diet, yet the more I’ve learned about our ancestry the more it seeped into my overall lifestyle. I now have improved my sleep, my focus, my productivity, my creativity, my relationships, and my mindset. All thanks to what started as “a few weeks long” meat only elimination diet. 

This way of eating and getting back to more ancestral values has also inspired me to create art as a carnivore, focusing on the beauty of food animals and the nourishing, health promoting products they provide us. 

I think art changes how people see the world. I think art informs what is valued as beautiful and admirable. Art has been a part of every revolution, evolution, and social movement throughout history. 

There are trends in art just like in any other fashion and while you can walk into any museum and see stunning images of still life featuring meat as a sign of wealth and prosperity in old master paintings – nowadays we have lost it. 

Over time, with the rise of processed foods and the vegan/vegetarian agenda we seemed to have lost the beauty of meat and animal products as a society. A person can walk into any design shop and buy pizza pillows, cupcake shaped serving dishes and anything imaginable with a donut printed on it – yet you’ll never see a steak. 

I think this shift in visual culture to be more plant based is a part of the propaganda against meat, and I’m trying to do whatever I can to change it, by making it beautiful again. 


2) How did you eat before Carnivore.

My diet growing up was full of rice, pasta, and grains. I’ve had bread with pretty much every meal. processed foods were everywhere with treats and sweets. To try and be healthy I spent a few years mostly vegan/vegetarian, though I’d also ‘cheat’ a lot on the diet by going to supermarkets and buying processed carbs.

I could eat two pints of ice cream with some gummy bears instead of a real meal. I didn’t cook for myself or knew how to make a tasty meal until my mid 20’s. I also worked in the food industry in my teens and early twenties and would just eat at work and take leftovers home.

I got more and more unwell as time passed yet didn’t connect it to diet for the longest time.


3) Why did you try Carnivore to begin with.

I’d get extremely ill at least twice a year with a bacterial or viral infection. I’ve always had hormonal issues had quite bad PCOS. I had IBS and was later diagnosed with Crohn’s, after a flair of gastritis. I’ve always had joint pains and swelling in my joints. I suffered from migraines and was depressed and lazy, lacking all motivation.

About 5 years ago I got into a very toxic relationship that caused me a great deal of stress, and the majority of my issues got worse during that time. I was on an extremely restrictive diet and lost a lot of weight quite rapidly which led to me developing a binge eating disorder. I was very unhappy and had brain fog – I felt I wasn’t able to think at the same speed as before, processing words or remembering things became rather difficult.

I was desperate to find some way to stop the binge cravings and through reading online found the keto diet and decided to try it.

I was on keto for about a year and a half and many of the issues I was struggling with got much better, but weren’t gone. The migraines decreased in frequency, my joints weren’t hurting as much, my digestions was a bit more stable yet the binge eating persisted and I felt completely out of control, and each episode brought all the symptoms back.

I started going to doctors who kept sending me to other doctors and each test made them order more tests. My bloodwork came back a mess: I’ve had rheumatoid factor come back positive, inflammatory markers were very high, my thyroid antibodies were extremely elevated, and the thyroid hormones were low, and my calprotectin was over 700 when it should be below 40.

I was put on thyroid meds and steroids, PPI’s and a few other pills with no helps – my wellbeing and quality of life decreased to such a level I got desperate. This is when I started to dive into the literature and research how to ‘fix’ myself. After listening to podcasts with Dr. Shawn baker and Mikhaila Peterson and put myself on a carnivore diet for “3-4 weeks max” only it lasted over 3 years and I’m never going back.


4) How do you personally approach the Carnivore Diet.

I started the diet around July 2017. It took a lot of personal experimentation and data collection until I found what works best for me. I think this is probably the case with most people who start trying to resolve multiple issues. I started by cutting out of plant foods yet still including pork, dairy, eggs and chicken. Over time I realised pork and chicken aren’t good for me, and milk products have to be raw and fermented. I only eat pastured eggs.

Nowadays I eat beef, lamb, venison, goat, organ meats and sea food. I live in a small town in the UK and have an amazing family farm that raises all the previously mentioned animals and at least 6-7 kinds of poultry so variety is never a problem, yet still find myself sticking to the same meals over and over.

Since now I’m trying to lose some fat, I eat two meals a day, about 300-450g of meat per meal depending on how lean it is, and use beef tallow, goats’ butter or ghee to cook with. In the last two months I’ve also been adding some non-sweet fruit, vegetables, eggs and some fermented dairy with no adverse reactions. About 85-95% of my calories are coming from meat and animal products.

My favourites are all the various cuts from the rib area, beef tongue, lamb chops and salmon.

5) What benefits have you seen since starting the Carnivore Diet.


Within the first few weeks my digestion got much better and became regular. IBS and Crohn’s were gone within about two months at most, my sleep improved, my PCOS normalised and I started getting my period again, my joints became less inflamed, walking and then going back to exercising became easier. I was off all steroids and PPI’s within less than 8 weeks.

After a year on the diet my thyroid antibodies were back to normal, yet my thyroid levels themselves were low, so I was still medicated for it. Two years after starting the carnivore diet I was able to get off all thyroid meds as well.

My body composition improved and I was able to gain and maintain muscle, increase my bone density and get rid of my brain fog and all mental health issues. No migraines, no weird aches and pains.

On the carnivore diet I feel calm, happy, content, a lot less agitated, I’m never anxious and can handle stress very well. It’s as if this way of eating was a facilitator of internal zen.


6) What negatives have you found with the Carnivore Diet.

It did require a lot of patience, consistency, tracking, and trial and error to finally find true health. I had to do a lot of experimentation with my food to figure out pork and chicken weren’t good for me, to figure out that if I overeat I have issues even if I’m only eating foods I normally do very well with. I had some issues with histamines which took experimenting and tracking to figure out, I had to experiment with my fat to protein ratio to find what I do best with. The Crohn’s and the steroids depleted a lot of my vitamins and minerals some of which I had to supplement. My progress wasn’t always linear and was made much slower by the fact that I also battelled the binge eating craving despite being fully carnivore. It helped make the binge eating more manageable, yet I wasn’t truly recovered and it was extremely discouraging hearing experts on podcasts time after time state “you can’t overeat on steak and eggs” because I was living proof you very much can and that no matter how much eliminate – even the excess of good foods can lead to problems or prevent healing.

It wasn’t until I added stearic acid to my cooking fats (a la Brad Marshall) that I saw the cravings diminish until they were completely gone.

It was also harder on my social life with regard to eating out and eating with people, but I made it work and my real friends/family don’t mind it and are used to it by now.


7) Do you exercise on the Carnivore Diet, if so how do you find it and what do you do.


I love exercise. I do resistance training. I used to work out 3-4 times a week and do long gym sessions, yet this year I transitioned more into home workouts and invested in resistance bands, kettlebells and a cast iron dumbbell set. I now do shorter, more intense functional training.

I recover very well from my workouts; I am very strong and find building muscle relatively easy.


8) What piece of advice would you give someone who is interested in trying this diet, but hasn’t taken the leap yet.

This is an extremely powerful intervention that can change your life and health for the better, however it’s not magic. You may still have issues that other people in the community say cleared for them within 3 days, and it can be very discouraging and lead to a feeling of being broken, but it just takes dedication.

Every change has a transitional period where things feel unfamiliar or strange and you miss your old ways but remembering why you’re doing it helps so much. You can get used to anything and anything can seem normal, no matter how foreign the idea was when you heard it first. If your current normal is inflamed, in pain, struggling to think clearly or get motivated – carnivore will 100% help. It’s an extremely simple diet which isn’t easy to implement but you overcome the initial hurdles it’s worth it.


9) Do you think Carnivore will ever be accepted as a mainstream diet.

I think that in the future more and more doctors will use it as a healing tool for their patients, which will help legitimize it in the eyes of the public.

This way of eating is essentially fighting the way in which big parts of our society and economy are founded on, so there will be resistance and pushback throughout the way. I do believe that evidence speak for themselves and the voices of people in the community are reaching larger audiences now. There are doctors educating other doctors on low carb and carnivore as treatment modalities which means it’s growing. The obesity and chronic disease epidemic took decades to develop and I think that we now have the power of the internet to speed up the timeline in which carnivore will grow. I hope that by then the cost of entry and price of meat won’t be a limiting factor for population in poor areas which arguably need this diet more than others.


10) Anything you would like to add, and where can people follow you.


For me the carnivore diet opened up so many things. I did a butchery class, went to live and volunteer on a farm for 6 weeks, started making meat based art, did a nutrition certification and am a much better and more resilient person for having been through all of this.
 
I am on instagram as @healthy.craft and am about to launch a new store for my meat-based art on nosetotail.org, in collaboration with the maker of the ‘Food Lies’ film, Brian Sanders.

Ketogenic Endurance – I hoped you enjoyed this post.

If you like what I am about, check out the below.

Amazon

Carnivore Fit Expanded edition – eBook and Paperback

Clothing – Ketogenic Endurance Carnivore Success Company

Low Content Books – Journals, Notebooks, Diaries and Planners.

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Categories
Meat Up Year One

Meat Up: 1 year later with Dawn

It has been a year since Dawn’s carnivore success story which can be found here

Interview with Dawn

1) How would you currently describe your current way of eating.

I am very much part of the ‘carnivore-ish’ crowd. 99.5% of my diet is meat, eggs and dairy (and I love experimenting with new cuts and bits of organ meat – pork head terrine is lovely!) but I am experimenting with what I can add back into my diet.  I’m avoiding gluten and oxalates but haven’t yet found anything that doesn’t trigger a physical reaction (or sugar cravings). Long term, it looks like my diet might be made up of meat, eggs, dairy and the occasional ice cream! 

2) What have you learned regarding nutrition over the last year.

Oh… loads! Nutrient density is the most important thing for my own personal nutrition.  It is key to satiety, energy levels and keeping my inflammation at bay.  Fat is not my enemy and grains are not my friend. More importantly, I learned that other people’s ideas about diet aren’t what keep me healthy.  Doing my own thing has always worked for me elsewhere in life so, if ‘eating the rainbow’ isn’t for me, that’s ok, too. Oxalates are, quite possibly, the cause of all of my EDS symptoms and, without them, I can walk. Vitamin C turns to oxalate if we have too much…  I could write a book with how much I’ve learned about food this year! 

3) What health & Fitness improvements, and/or setbacks have you experienced in the last year.

Adding new foods back into my diet was a little scary and, on the occasions that trying new things led to uncomfortable bloating, joint pain, or headaches, I questioned if it was all worth it… but I feel stronger than I ever have!  I will not stop trying new things, but I am comfortable eating meat on its own for long stretches between trials.  I am not interested in being in pain or dislocating joints for the sake of fruit or flour. Between nutrition experiments, my fitness has come on leaps and bounds.  I have danced, climbed, and run my way through 2020 and hope to keep being able to do new things! 

4) What are your health and fitness goals in the year ahead.

I’d like to be able to do a handstand, after getting involved in aerial hammock practice in my garden in lockdown.  I love being upside down.  That’s a big goal for me, as someone who has woken up hundreds of times with dislocated shoulders….. but I feel like it’s achievable!  

5) Anything else to add? and where can people follow your journey?

I can’t quite believe the life that I’m building and how much of it is down to giving up vegetables and grains.  When everything I’ve ever been taught is that meat and fat are bad and veg and grains are good….  it’s incredible that I am doing so well with the opposite philosophy. 

Ketogenic Endurance – I hoped you enjoyed this post.

If you like what I am about, check out the below.

Amazon

Carnivore Fit Expanded edition – eBook and Paperback

Clothing – Ketogenic Endurance Carnivore Success Company

Low Content Books – Journals, Notebooks, Diaries and Planners.

Media