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Yes yes yes !!! As Daniel Bryan would say. I have finally recovered from my calf injury and could get out running again. Well “finally” is a little dramatic, I only missed 12 days, but it seemed like a long time to me!!!

The good thing about having such a long preparation period for my first Marathon is that I don’t need to get too stressed about bumps in the road. I think a lot of runners are often more concerned with how the injury is affecting their Marathon training programme, rather than the injury itself. Which could lead to them returning to early. So yes, I was desperate to get back running, but it was because I missed it. Not because I was worried about a training plan, after all running should be fun!

Week 23 – 15th September 2016 – Aerobic Base Run – 3.1m – 00:45:52 – 14:27min/m

Week 23 – 13th September 2016 – Aerobic Base Run – 3m – 00:45:22 – 14:44min/m

As you can see I managed to get out running twice this week. I took it pretty easy for 2 reasons.

  1. I just wanted to test the calf out, to make sure it was fully healed.
  2. I have just bought some Barefoot Running shoes. So you have to take it easy with mileage and intensity, until your body adapts to them.

I aim to do a further 3 easy 3 mile runs next week, to continue bedding in. Then I will look to start bringing back the weekend long run.

After reading Born To Run, I decided barefoot running would be something worthwhile for me to try ( http://www.chrismcdougall.com/ ). Barefoot running technique promotes midfoot striking, and shortens your stride. In theory it should prevent injuries. Even though Nike and the like, would have you believe your feet will probably disintegrate into dust.

http://www.barefootrunning.fas.harvard.edu/5BarefootRunning&TrainingTips.html

http://www.runbare.com/barefoot-benefits

When I am wearing normal running shoes, it is a constant effort for me not to heel strike. Even worse I think I over compensate, and land too much on my toes. Which could be an underlining factor of my calf injuries. I have done a bit of research on how to run barefoot, however what I have found is your body naturally adapts to your new shoes. I have worn my new barefoot running shoes from Freet Footware twice, and I love them. Without really thinking, I naturally land midfoot, have a shorter gait and a higher cadence. Very positive so far.

My new shoes are Freet Meta Ayr ( http://www.freetfootwear.co.uk/index.php/2014-02-21-15-10-24/4-1-shoes )

As I am just returning from injury, and testing out some new shoes it was a perfect time for my wife to start running again. She did great and kept up with me. So hopefully she carriers on with running, as when she gets out there she enjoys it. However when she is busy with work, it is not a priority for her. Whereas I am training for a Marathon so have to make time to run regardless. Even though she kept up, I think she was surprised that there was a marked improvement in my running times since she last ran with me a couple of months ago. I think she thought my Heart Rate monitor was broken! I currently do all my training at a Heart Rate of 139, known as MAF training (https://philmaffetone.com/180-formula/ ). When I first started training, Heather often had to wait for me. So it just goes to show that the training is working. I still think the MAF test for endurance training, is the ideal way for me to train for a marathon on a ketogenic diet.

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